Culture track

We want to know what special sauce you use for interpersonal insights!
What makes open technology and culture communities effective? Demonstrate how you motivate people to work together well. Example topics from the past include “’Why did you do that?’ You’re more automated than you think.” and “Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls.”

Sessions for this track

* 24 Hours of Awesome: Science Hack Day Portland

Science Hack Day is a free-to-attend, open-source, worldwide, volunteer-organized event aimed at bringing together scientists, developers, engineers, students, and anyone else passionate or curious about science. The goal is simple: in 24 hours form a team and make something (fun, useful, nonsensical, anything!) with science. Hear from the organizers of the first Science Hack Day in Portland on how it was put together, just how awesome it was, and how open (science, source, hardware, web) played a vital part.
Culture
Jessica Hardwicke, Lilly Winfree

* Federating With The Trouble - Running Decentralized Communities

As moderators and admins of a mastodon/gnu social instance called Toot.Cat we were quickly propelled into navigating the strange new world of decentralized community stewardship.
Culture
Briar Schreiber, Lynn Cyrin, Brian Mock

* Geek Choir

In this session, we explore ways to improve team cohesion, cooperation, connection, and presence for each other via song.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hi! It takes more than engineering skills to make your company successful. Let's talk about it.

Let's be real: tech companies value engineering skills over most other skills, and it shows in both salaries and decisionmaking. This talk is about why this happens, why it's problematic, and how we can refocus importance on all the skills that make companies successful.
Culture
Lyzi Diamond

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture
Lucy Wyman

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture
Kim Crayton

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture
Letta Raven

* How to Pay People for Their Work

Paying people for their work is radical, whether we're talking about open source contributions, second-shift diversity work, or even care at home. But giving people the resources necessary to make these community contributions is the only way to make our communities more sustainable.
Culture
Thursday Bram

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Importance of communication (Effective Communication) in Open Source communities

Open Source communities are excellent example of most diverse and globally spread work-space. Although, this is a major plus and feels amazing to work in such a diverse culture, but at the same time we need to face the challenge of accurate communication.
Culture
Amita Sharma

* In 1968 Mom built a computer: women's routes as technologists

On the surface, this story shares vignettes about my Mom. But its purpose is to increase awareness of human resources in technology, and overlooked pathways of young technologiests. "c. 1973 RCA hired her for the chip prototyping lab. Her new co-workers compared each other's crochet at lunch. A marathon week of late-night needlework bought her acceptance and promotion to supervisor. She told me stories about the ladies who wrapped wires for NASA a few years before, about women's centuries of fingers in technical fiber-crafts finally being noticed when it put men on the moon."
Culture
Katheryn Sutter

* Liar Liar Pants on Fire: Being a Kid in the Tech World

A year and 4 months ago, I turned thirteen. According to many sites I use, however, I turned twenty-six. It’s a little odd, so here’s why:
Culture
Sebastian Waterhouse

* Morning Keynote — Tech Reform

Nicole will talk to us about Tech Reform
Culture
Nicole Sanchez

* Onboarding is Unboxing

A great product has a built-in “unboxing” planned from the start. It never leaves customers thinking about how to do something or figure it out. The funny thing about the companies that make those product experiences is that they usually don't give the same treatment to their employees. Let's start thinking of onboarding as unboxing - and start thinking of our team members as humans!
Culture
Kristen Gallagher

* Outside Looking In: Working to Reshape the Cultural Memory of Tech

This presentation talks about how the culture of technology is built around the cultural influence of those who've come first to the table. We'll look into how these narratives are made, what we can do about it, and the best ways these narratives can be challenged to make tech more open and accommodating to those on the outside.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Read, Write, Talk, Sing, Play: What Early Literacy Can Teach Us About Software Literacy

I'm not saying that you have to speak parentese to beginning software learners. They might be quite offended with you doing that, actually. What beginners often need, though, is not just to be set in front of a tutorial and told to come back when they're finished, but to have someone on hand to bounce questions off of or to talk them through problems and exercises so that they understand. Learners often pick up useful information by observing someone else at work using the language, but they can't just be there while you do things and learn it all by observation alone. One of the best skills a librarian has that goes mostly unnoticed is that they're really great at narrating themselves to others. When demonstrating (sometimes for the sixteenth time) how to go through a procedure to obtain resources or run searches, librarians narrate what they are doing and why. When reading a book to tiny people, youth services librarians often ask questions about what the characters are doing or feeling, so that the tiny people can use both the text and the pictures to decode what's going on in the story. Key information about the story is often communicated visually in a picture book, and sometimes in complete contradiction to the text. By providing scaffolding through narration, the librarian provides context and reasoning for the actions they're taking. By asking questions at regular intervals, the librarian can check to make sure understanding is happening and adjust to include perspectives they may not have been taking into account before. [...] Talking and explaining things to your learners, and with each other, is the best way to help them learn. So if you get the opportunity to have someone shadow you and ask you annoying questions about what you're doing and why you're doing it that way, take up the opportunity. (And request it all gets documented. Trust me.) By talking through things with someone who doesn't have your expertise, you shore up your own knowledge and help someone get more of their own. That leads to literacy.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Real Life Experiences Balancing a Viable Vendor Eco-system with Open Source Community

Experiences balancing Open Source Community and a viable vendor/consultancy model to promote a sustainable eco-system.
Culture
Tony McCormick

* Seasons of Debian - Summer of Code and Winter of Outreachy

A talk about Google Summer of Code and Outreachy Internship Program with Debian. Discusses Urvika Gola and Pranav Jain’s work with Debian on an open source project for an android ‘Lumicall’ application.
Culture
Urvika Gola, Pranav Jain

* The Business of Open Source (or, how we think about it at CoreOS)

Peter Levine, a partner at Andreessen-Horowitz, famously said Red Hat would be the last successful OSS business. A dire forecast for the multitudes building their business atop of open source today. This talk is will dive into basic economic theory, how we’ve applied it at CoreOS, and ultimately describe what the current and next generation of open source business looks like.
Culture
Elsie Phillips, Paul Burt

* The Flatpak story - Let's explore world of a developer-centric Application Distribution!

Flatpak is a technology by the GNOME Project that runs applications in a runtime and sandbox. This talk will explore the shift in how applications will be distributed in the future and how it is lowering the bar of entry of hacking on increasingly large codebases like GNOME.
Culture
Sriram Ramkrishna

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

* Why Is a Raven Like a Pull Request: What Writing Workshops Can Bring to Code Reviews

Many talks aimed at beginners to open source contribution assume that concepts like peer review and justification of intent are brand new. If you have ever experienced the thrills–and/or horrors–of a writing workshop, many ideas central to a successful pull request aren't that new at all. Let's talk about what experienced workshoppers and the field of writing critique can bring to your OS project.
Culture
Christine Bryant-Ryback

* Writing Inclusively about Technology Topics

Based on The Responsible Communication Style Guide, this workshop is an introduction to the concepts in the style guide. It also covers how a style guide can be an effective part of the workflow when creating and promoting technology projects (including open source).
Culture
Thursday Bram

* You Wouldn't Reimplement an API: Lessons from Oracle v. Google

Imagine being called for jury duty and then getting forced into a Java bootcamp run by two instructors who hate each other and won’t stop saying the opposite things. Worse, both instructors are inconsistent with themselves.
Culture
Sarah Jeong

Proposals for this track

* #pdxtech The Shadow World of Portland tech

A panel of #pdxtech irc community members giving their take on the Portland tech scene
Culture 2017-03-07 22:29:05 +0000
Tyler Gillies

* 24 Hours of Awesome: Science Hack Day Portland

Science Hack Day is a free-to-attend, open-source, worldwide, volunteer-organized event aimed at bringing together scientists, developers, engineers, students, and anyone else passionate or curious about science. The goal is simple: in 24 hours form a team and make something (fun, useful, nonsensical, anything!) with science. Hear from the organizers of the first Science Hack Day in Portland on how it was put together, just how awesome it was, and how open (science, source, hardware, web) played a vital part.
Culture 2017-03-31 17:43:41 +0000
Jessica Hardwicke, Lilly Winfree

* Building Trust in Releases

Releasing an open source project is easy. Push code on Github and (optionally) release the package on PyPI, rubygems, or npm, and distribution packages. How do you build trust into releases so that your users can trust your product? If your product is critical to someone’s infrastructure, trust is even more critical.
Culture 2017-04-08 16:21:52 +0000
Nigel Babu

* Courageously Contributing - How OpenStack moves past conflict through patience and persistence.

Contributing code to open source projects can be intimidating. Disagreements happen, and we can find our changes caught in the middle. What can we do about it?
Culture 2017-03-30 15:14:52 +0000
Steve Lewis

* Diversity in Open Source Communities

This talk is about "Why diversity is important part of open source communities culture. How to make your Open Source project and community diverse and inclusive, so that everyone feels good about joining. Different ways to be more inclusive and welcoming."
Culture 2017-04-06 06:52:02 +0000
Amita Sharma

* Edge Case Too: The Intersections of Identity

A thing that human brains do is generalize groups based on the individuals that they personally know who make up that group, either as examples of the group or as exceptions to the group. Thus, you get both #YesAllWomen and #NotAllMen. The easy way to beat this human tendency is to surround yourself with more than one person of that given identity or group membership....More likely than not, there's going to be one, maybe two, people in your immediate work circle who are part of groups that you're interested in recruiting more of into your profession or project. Usually. As we pointed out above, in some cases, you have one in your entire department who carry the entirety of their group identity with them wherever they may be going, without anyone else to be able to share the burden of being everyone's shortcut example of how that group behaves.
Culture 2017-03-07 20:00:12 +0000
Alex Byrne

* From the mouth of a child: A young hacker’s perspective on Open Source culture

I've been around Open Source my entire life. As a young FOSS dev, I've grown up looking at the community from the perspective that this is "my people". This talk looks at some of what I can definitively say are victories, a retrospective of two decades of lessons learned, and finally some challenges our community faces.
Culture 2017-03-10 01:42:02 +0000
Morgan Gangwere

* Graduating from "code monkey" to Engineer

No matter how humble your beginnings, you too can write code, publish software, and be a force for good in the community.
Culture 2017-03-31 16:33:20 +0000
Eric Mann

* Here's Your Computer, Good Luck, Bye! Lessons Learned in Onboarding

Have you ever joined a team where they just turned you loose on day one and expected you to come up to speed on your own? How did that feel? In this presentation, we're going to look at onboarding from the perspective of a new hire. We'll go over what's worked and what hasn't worked for the teams I've been on. The specifics will be different for your teams, of course, but we'll discover some general principles together. By the end of the talk, you'll be coming up with your own ideas you can apply to your team's onboarding process. By making a few simple changes, you can improve morale, boost productivity, and keep your fellow engineers around longer.
Culture 2017-04-10 01:00:09 +0000
Ian Dees

* Lessons Learned in Teaching FOSS: How to Become a Contributor

How do you jump into a project and find your way around? I can help you avoid the pitfalls and find some ways to engage that have been successful in a college course.
Culture 2017-03-31 17:31:01 +0000
Becka Morgan

* Magic, myth and the devops

Effective DevOps through collaboration and story telling.
Culture 2017-04-10 05:15:41 +0000
Jennifer Davis

* Non-programming ways to contribute to a FOSS project

Open Source world is really fascinating and almost everyone wants to join and contribute to FOSS. Though many of us may know one or more programming languages here and do coding but, there are many people, who love to contribute in open source ,but are non-coders.
Culture 2017-04-06 06:40:29 +0000
Amita Sharma

* Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

It doesn’t help that the industry puts some pretty unrealistic titles and requirements out there, like ninjas, rockstars, and sorceresses. Anyone heard anything like this? “Looking for a PERL Warlock, with 10+ years in Ruby, Linux kernel contributions, and experience doing isometric transformations in canvas. COBOL experience a plus.” In the early years, even the worst of us were considered wizards because we could do what others couldn’t, plain and simple. But now, people think of it as much more of a commodity position, but still expect us to have the proficiency and skill of a ninja. Somewhere along the lines, people stopped admiring rockstars and started expecting them. I am a yellow belt in two different martial arts (That’s one above I-Just-Started), I’ve played in a cover band, and still dabble in some slight of hand coin magic. This does not make me a ninja, a rockstar, or a sorcerer. Trying to live up to these standards is tough to say the least.
Culture 2017-04-08 16:22:39 +0000
Dan Linn

* Privacy, Security and Crayons - Security Concepts for Kids

Security and Privacy are difficult enough concepts for adults, trying to frame them for children and young adults can feel impossible. In this talk, I will look at security and privacy topics, ways to protect against them and some examples of how to best frame this information for a younger audience.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:16:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Starting Early – Open Source through Google Code-in

A talk about Google Code-in experience, the opportunities it provides for high school students, why we need more programs/contests like this, and the importance of mentorship to younger contributors.
Culture 2017-04-10 06:00:32 +0000
Joshua Pan

* Teaching Undergraduates how to contribute to Open Source

Surprisingly, most college students, even those enrolled in a CS program, don't really know what Open Source means. What does Open Source mean? What is the difference between each of the most popular Open Source licenses? What development tools and processes do you need to be familiar with to begin to contribute to an Open Source project? How do you evaluate an Open Source project to determine if it is the right one for you? How do you gain enough confidence to submit your first pull request to a live open source project?
Culture 2017-03-31 20:38:22 +0000
Chadd Williams

* The Kids Are Going to be 200 OK

Infosec is like sex ed. If you wait until kids need it, you have waited too long. Schools don't, peers can't, we have to.
Culture 2017-04-01 02:03:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Monster on the Project

Abusive behaviour can have profound effects on personal relationships but it can also make open source contributing and office life miserable. For those stuck in a team with co workers who exhibit toxic behavior, going to work every day can feel like going to a battlefield. Knowing how to identify and how to respond to unreasonable behavior is vital. In this talk we will look at the ways we can improve our office and FOSS communities by recognizing, managing and gracefully removing this toxic behavior.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:13:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* The Path of Developer

Let's know the journey of a curious girl since her very first code then school, work, community... good deploys, failures... learning... contributing... leading...
Culture 2017-04-10 02:29:03 +0000
Anderson Casimiro

* Transform Your Organization Like a Jedi, You Should

Take home some practical Jedi mind-tricks and use them with ease to make your organization more awesome.
Culture 2017-03-28 23:28:03 +0000
Eric Maxwell

* Welcome, new person! We're glad you're here.

One of the things I want to know when I walk into a new organization is "how do things happen here?" This includes both "how do we talk about about things getting done" and "how they actually get done".
Culture 2017-04-10 06:56:33 +0000
Social Justice SRE

* Why the Internet Loves Cats

When you love your work, when you are passionate, it is easy to push yourself too hard and burn out. Burnout is a real problem in the tech industry. We hear a lot about self care, but what is it? How do you do it? And what does it have to do with cats on the internet? In this interactive session, we will explore the subject together to find an answer to these burning questions.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:28:03 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Your Emotional API: How Being A Better Human Makes You A Better Developer

Feelings are messy and uncomfortable, so why can't you just ignore them? Because research shows that emotional regulation skills have a significant impact on your job performance. In this talk you’ll learn how emotions are affecting your work by modeling them as an API and looking at their code.
Culture 2017-04-03 02:42:03 +0000
John Sawers