Culture track

We want to know what special sauce you use for interpersonal insights!
What makes open technology and culture communities effective? Demonstrate how you motivate people to work together well. Example topics from the past include “’Why did you do that?’ You’re more automated than you think.” and “Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls.”

Proposals for this track

* #pdxtech The Shadow World of Portland tech

A panel of #pdxtech irc community members giving their take on the Portland tech scene
Culture 2017-03-07 22:29:05 +0000
Tyler Gillies

* Courageously Contributing - How OpenStack moves past conflict through patience and persistence.

Contributing code to open source projects can be intimidating. Disagreements happen, and we can find our changes caught in the middle. What can we do about it?
Culture 2017-03-30 15:14:52 +0000
Steve Lewis

* Edge Case Too: The Intersections of Identity

A thing that human brains do is generalize groups based on the individuals that they personally know who make up that group, either as examples of the group or as exceptions to the group. Thus, you get both #YesAllWomen and #NotAllMen. The easy way to beat this human tendency is to surround yourself with more than one person of that given identity or group membership....More likely than not, there's going to be one, maybe two, people in your immediate work circle who are part of groups that you're interested in recruiting more of into your profession or project. Usually. As we pointed out above, in some cases, you have one in your entire department who carry the entirety of their group identity with them wherever they may be going, without anyone else to be able to share the burden of being everyone's shortcut example of how that group behaves.
Culture 2017-03-07 20:00:12 +0000
Alex Byrne

* From the mouth of a child: A young hacker’s perspective on Open Source culture

I've been around Open Source my entire life. As a young FOSS dev, I've grown up looking at the community from the perspective that this is "my people". This talk looks at some of what I can definitively say are victories, a retrospective of two decades of lessons learned, and finally some challenges our community faces.
Culture 2017-03-10 01:42:02 +0000
Morgan Gangwere

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture 2017-03-07 17:36:49 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture 2017-03-09 14:20:14 +0000
Kim Crayton

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture 2017-03-30 00:04:26 +0000
Letta Raven

* Read, Write, Talk, Sing, Play: What Early Literacy Can Teach Us About Software Literacy

I'm not saying that you have to speak parentese to beginning software learners. They might be quite offended with you doing that, actually. What beginners often need, though, is not just to be set in front of a tutorial and told to come back when they're finished, but to have someone on hand to bounce questions off of or to talk them through problems and exercises so that they understand. Learners often pick up useful information by observing someone else at work using the language, but they can't just be there while you do things and learn it all by observation alone. One of the best skills a librarian has that goes mostly unnoticed is that they're really great at narrating themselves to others. When demonstrating (sometimes for the sixteenth time) how to go through a procedure to obtain resources or run searches, librarians narrate what they are doing and why. When reading a book to tiny people, youth services librarians often ask questions about what the characters are doing or feeling, so that the tiny people can use both the text and the pictures to decode what's going on in the story. Key information about the story is often communicated visually in a picture book, and sometimes in complete contradiction to the text. By providing scaffolding through narration, the librarian provides context and reasoning for the actions they're taking. By asking questions at regular intervals, the librarian can check to make sure understanding is happening and adjust to include perspectives they may not have been taking into account before. [...] Talking and explaining things to your learners, and with each other, is the best way to help them learn. So if you get the opportunity to have someone shadow you and ask you annoying questions about what you're doing and why you're doing it that way, take up the opportunity. (And request it all gets documented. Trust me.) By talking through things with someone who doesn't have your expertise, you shore up your own knowledge and help someone get more of their own. That leads to literacy.
Culture 2017-03-07 20:14:58 +0000
Alex Byrne

* Real Life Experiences Balancing a Viable Vendor Eco-system with Open Source Community

Experiences balancing Open Source Community and a viable vendor/consultancy model to promote a sustainable eco-system.
Culture 2017-03-10 05:18:19 +0000
Tony McCormick

* Seasons of Debian - Summer of Code and Winter of Outreachy

A talk about Google Summer of Code and Outreachy Internship Program with Debian. Discusses Urvika Gola and Pranav Jain’s work with Debian on an open source project for an android ‘Lumicall’ application.
Culture 2017-03-24 03:21:05 +0000
Urvika Gola, Pranav Jain

* The Business of Open Source (or, how we think about it at CoreOS)

Peter Levine, a partner at Andreessen-Horowitz, famously said Red Hat would be the last successful OSS business. A dire forecast for the multitudes building their business atop of open source today. This talk is will dive into basic economic theory, how we’ve applied it at CoreOS, and ultimately describe what the current and next generation of open source business looks like.
Culture 2017-03-29 03:50:11 +0000
Elsie Phillips, Paul Burt

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture 2017-03-22 21:30:06 +0000
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture 2017-03-01 05:34:52 +0000
Carol Smith

* Transform Your Organization Like a Jedi, You Should

Take home some practical Jedi mind-tricks and use them with ease to make your organization more awesome.
Culture 2017-03-28 23:28:03 +0000
Eric Maxwell

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture 2017-03-07 20:49:59 +0000
Sam Scott